The Ultimate chest freezer temperature controller reviews

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SkipIt asked Freezer energy usage calculation watts to amps?

Is my math wrong here? I freezer chest uses 254 KWH per year. = 254,000 watts per year. That's 21,166 watts per month and 705 watts per day and 29.39 watts per hour. 29.39 / 12volts = 2.45 amps per hour consumed, right? 1 battery rated 225AH would power this freezer for 91 hours, assuming no energy loss.. Is that right? So 1 solar panel that generates 145w or 7.75 amps, would nearly keep the battery full AND charge the battery at the same time? So 10 panels and 2 batteries is overkill? Overkill is ok because I want to run other things too.

And got the following answer:

254 KWH per year is about 30 watts average power consumption. 254 KWH per year. = 254,000 watts-hours average per year = 700 watts-hours average per day = 30 watt-hours average per hour = 30 watts average. The concept of "watts per year" and similar terms you used make no sense. Average means average. The actual energy on a particular day will vary with things like room temperature, how much the door is opened, and how much warm food you put in the freezer. Perhaps you should invest ~$25 in a Kill-A-Watt meter and figure out what your worst case power consumption will be. >1 battery rated 225AH would power this freezer for 91 hours, assuming no energy loss. Assuming that it is a 12 volt battery and you don't mind trashing the battery then yes. Assuming you want a reasonable battery life, actually have energy loss, and are using a good inverter, lets say 40 hours. >So 1 solar panel that generates 145w or 7.75 amps, would nearly keep the battery full AND charge the battery at the same time? Assuming that the panel is rated at 145 peak watts, then that's not realistic. Peak rated watts translates to "output under ideal conditions into an ideal load". Adjust downwards to account for location, installation details, time of year....... Add add some losses depending on charge controller for energy loss in charging the battery. Lets just guess you get 400 watt-hours per panel on an average day into the battery, that's about 13 hours of average power usage, not even a whole days usage under average conditions. >2 batteries is overkill? No. Hardly overkill. >10 panels .......... is overkill? Depends on location and other details.

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